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Image

Date / Category
Size / Price

Title / Description

Web Dates

1.

April 1985

Woodcut

16 1/8" x 11 1/8"

The First Cut

What's in the meaning and doing?

Cutting into wood for a woodcut print for the first time?

The first time someone offends deeply?

Would this work make the 'cut' or would it be the first cut?

The first woodcut print in what would become not only a new series but also a new direction.

 

2.

May 1985

Woodcut

11 1/8" x 11"

Woodscape 1

As my scapeseries emerged, I decided to designate them by the methods of printmaking.  I decided to call any print made from woodblock and Linoleum block to be a "Woodscape," any from etching to be in the Scapeseries.  Lithographs to be Lithoscapes; silkscreens to be Screenscapes and later my three dimensional works to be referenced as Scape Constructions.  These designations are useful ways to reference the techniques used and the resulting effects.

07/2004

3.

May 1985

Woodcut

12  1/2" x 11 1/4"

Woodscape 2

07/2004

4.

August 1985

Etching

11 3/4" x 8 7/8"

Scapeseries 1

07/2004

5.

November 1985

Etching

24" x 17 3/4"

Scapeseries 2

 

6.

January 1986

Etching

24" x 17 3/4"

Scapeseries 3

07/2004

7.

March 1986

Linocut & Woodcut

12" x 9"

Woodscape 3

07/2004

8. SOLD

March 1986

Woodcut

6" x 10"

Woodscape 4: The Farm Pond Glorified

 

9.

March 1986

Etching

12 7/8"x 18"

Scapeseries 4

07/2004

10.

March 1986

Linocut

12" x 9"

Woodscape 5: Trinity / (Landscape) 3

07/2004

11.

March 1986

Etching

18" x 24"

Scapeseries 5a

One print of this edition was destroyed in the River North Gallery district fire in Chicago in 1989.

07/2004

12. SOLD

March 1986

Drypoint & Etching

8" x 6"

Scapeseries 6: Grove

 

13.

March 1986

Drypoint & Etching on

Handmade Paper

13 1/2" x 12 1/4"

Scapeseries 6: Grove

07/2004

14.

March 1986

Lithograph  & Serigraph

22" x 26"

Lithoscreen Scape 1: Forest Park 1

07/2004

15.

March 1986

Monoprint

40" x 27"

On the Third Hour (#1)

A monoprint of monotype: printed of printing inks from a sheet of Plexiglas; three hours in the complete process.  Its companion "On the Third Hour (#2) "was destroyed in the 1989 Chicago Gallery fire in the River North gallery district.

07/2004

16.

April 1986

Serigraph

21" x 26"

Screenscape A: Forest Park 2

07/2004

17.

March 1986

Monoprint

40" x 27"

(Destroyed by fire.)

On the Third Hour (#2)

 

18.

May 1987

Etching

6 3/4" x 5"

#7/Lincoln Park 1

 

19. SOLD

May 1987

Etching & Engraving

4" x 6"

(Edition sold out.)

#8/Lincoln Park 2

 

20.

March l989

Linocut

4" x 6"

Woodscape 6: Steadfast

 

21. SOLD

June 1989

Handcolored Lithograph

20" x 24"

All Directions Appeared of Equal Interest

 

22. SOLD

August 1989

Handcolored lithograph Construction I

20 1/4" x 24" x 3"

And the Forest Echoed in Color (Scape Construction)

07/2004

23. SOLD

July 1989

3‑plate etching

engraving, handcolor  on burnt edge paper

6 1/4" x 8 1/2"

After the Fire

"After the Fire" and "Regeneration" were created after a fire in Chicago's River North gallery district consumed 5 of my largest works. "Regeneration" sold at a Benefit Auction for the Chicago Artists Coalition Emergency Fund program that provides assistance to artists in dire times of need. 

 

24. SOLD

July 1989

3‑plate etching

engraving, handcolor  on burnt edge paper

6 1/4" x 8 1/2

Regeneration

 "Regeneration" and "After the Fire" were created after a fire in Chicago's River North gallery district destroyed a block of galleries and consumed five of my largest works at a time of first connection with gallery representation.

"Regeneration" sold at a Benefit Auction for the Chicago Artists' Coalition's Emergency Fund program, that provides assistance to artists in dire times of need. 

 

25. SOLD

September 1989

Handcolored etching

12" x 12"

Scapeseries 9: Homage to Plotinus

Plotinus, supposed philosophical writer following Plato, was used to argue the inclusion of stained glass (light emanating from Platonic Ideals to the earthly realm) by the builders of Gothic but now destroyed cathedral of St. Denis

 

26.

September 1989

Woodcut

8" x 10"

Woodscape 7: One of Eight

Of special note on this work is that it is printed on both sides, using the same mahogany wood block, and using both sides of that block for printing.

The muted, more matte colors are achieved by printing from the back side, saturating the rice paper. The more glossy, more shinny inks are printed on the front side, creating a nice contrast with the muted ones saturating through from the backside.  When the work was completed, the mahogany wood block was taken to a sawmill and sliced, making mirror images  which became the foundation for "Enter Into, Adherence"; and "Adherence 2"

07/2004

27. SOLD

September 1989

Handcolored serigraph stick & wire construction

20" x 28 1/2" x 2"

Scape Construction II (Color Fecundity)

07/2004

28.

November 1989

Handcolored lithograph construction

21 1/2" x 24" x 5"

Scape Construction III

07/2004

29. SOLD

November 1989

Handcolored lithograph with wood, sticks &  wire

22 3/4" x 28 l/2" x 3

Totems and Caverns

 

30. SOLD

August 1990

Handcolored monoprint

10 1/2" x 13 5/8"

Yosemite. 

Version One and a similar Version Two; both sold. Printed directly from a sheet of Plexiglas®.

 

31. SOLD

September 1990

Monoprint with handcoloring, oil pastels, pencil, & acrylics

40" x 26 1/2"

Untitled

 

32. SOLD

August 1990

Carved Mahogany & woodcut collage with oils

8" x 10"

Enter, Into, Adherence

 

33. SOLD

September 1990

Handcolored etching construction with

wood, gloves, stick,

wire & stone

22" x 26 1/2" x 5"

Scapeseries 3a: Landscape Bouquet

 

34.

November 1990

Oil on Canvas

5' x 4'

Over, Through, In, Among & About

 

35. SOLD

November 1990

Carved Mahogany & woodcut collage with stick, wire and acrylics

8" x 10" x 1 3/4"

Adherence 2

07/2004

36. Not For Sale

July 1991

Intaglio Etching ‑ Construction w/ handcoloring and acrylics

22 1/2" x 9" x 1"

Absolut‑Dauby

 

37. NotForSale

July 1991

Intaglio Etching ‑ Construction w/ handcoloring and acrylics on wood backdrop

22 1/2" 9" x 1"

Absolut‑Dauby

 

38. SOLD

February 2001

Handcolored monoprint

10 1/2" x 13 5/8"

Yosemite* (3rd Version)

 

39. SOLD

February 2001

Pastel chalks & pencil, Prisma

21" diameter

Looking Up Through the Tall Pines, Way Up, See The Bright Blue Sky, Togwotee Mountain, Wyoming. In Mountain Crow Language, Tog-wo-tee means 'from Here You Can Go Anywhere'.

07/2004

40. SOLD

May 2001

Pastel chalks & pencil Prisma

21" diameter

Looking Up - Through

07/2004

41. SOLD

June 2001

Multicolor etching with handcolor Prisma pencil

12" x 12"

Homage to Plotinus 2

Plotinus, supposed philosophical writer following Plato, was used to argue the inclusion of stained glass (light emanating from Platonic Ideals to the earthly realm) by the builders of Gothic but now destroyed cathedral of St. Denis.

 

42. SOLD

June 2001

Multicolor etching with handcoloring, Prisma pencil

24" x 17 3/4"

Scapeseries 3 – Revisited

 

43.

March 2002

Multicolor etching with handcoloring, Prisma pencil & pastels

24" x 17 3/4"

Scapeseries 3- Fall Version

In this hand colored version of the print "Scapeseries 3" I have used pastels, chalks and colored pencils over the etching and aquatints, coupled with 'a la poupe'e and color viscosity techniques in printmaking. This moves the formerly Summer time expression into one of Autumn.

07/2004

44. SOLD

May 2002

Multicolor etching with Mixed media (1/1)

24" x 17 3/4"

Scapeseries 2- Descending Waters

 

45. SOLD

June 2002

Monoprint

17" diameter

Sky and Water Connect, and Earth Turns Round

This monoprint (inks printed directly off of a Plexiglas® sheet) is one in a series of circular landscapes which are composed from the perspective of lying on the ground and looking up to the sky through the trees.  The circular format is based on the Zen Buddhist' Enso tradition or a mandala for meditation.

07/2004

46. SOLD

June 2002

Monoprint with Prisma pencil (1/1)

17" diameter

Shekinah

As with my other circular landscapes, the metaphor for spiritual growth and life is expressed in the platitude "take a different perspective."  The title of this  monoprint with hand coloring is a Jewish word meaning 'the divine light which dwells in all things."

07/2004

47. SOLD

August 2002

Multicolor etching with Mixed media (1/1)

18" x 24"

Scapeseries 5a Colors Falling

 

48. SOLD

September 2002

Monoprint w/ Prisma Pencil

17" diameter

Sky Window

See descriptions for both works:

This work is a similar monoprint with handcoloring using colored pencils.

07/2004

49. SOLD

January 2003

Multicolor etching with Pastels & Prisma

pencil (1/1)

24" x 17 3/4"

Scapeseries 3A

 

50.

February 2003

Etching w/Mixed Media

6 3/4" x 5"

#7/Lincoln Park 2A - 002

 

51.

February 2003

Multicolor etching with with Pastels & Prisma pencil (1/1)

6 3/4" x 5"

Morning Mist on the Stream

07/2004

52. SOLD

March 2003

Multicolor etching with Pastels & Prisma

pencil (1/1)

6 3/4" x 5"

Spring Lupins

One of my smaller works, but still just a fun. A basically three color print is enhanced with pastels and colored pencil to present the colors of pink and lavender Lupins which were abundant in open areas of the woods and meadows in late Spring.

 

53.

April 2003

Serigraph with oil crayon & Prisma pencil

21" x 26"

Spring's Exuberance

Spring seems to explode with everything in an unbounded intensity: weather changes, new growth, plenty of pollen, more than enough of everything as renewed colors delight our eyes.

07/2004

54.

May 2003

Lithograph with oil crayon, Prisma pencil & Pastels

19" x 23"

At Water's Edge

Water always requires a decision.

07/2004

55.
SOLD

July 2003

Lithograph w/Pastel Chalks and Prisma pencil

19" x 23"

Left at the Big Oak

Although both began as blue and white lithographic prints, "Left at the Big Oak" presents a quite different feel than "At Water's Edge."

I like titles that have a double meaning; a hint of ambiguity entices discovery.

 

56.

September 2003

Mixed Media: etching with pastels, chalks, Prisma pencil

12" x 9"

Nature's Color Harvest

Velvety, fibrous, rich and deep; Fall blankets all with soft textures.  Starting with a proof from "Scapeseries 1," this work incorporates pastels, chalks and colored pencil.  I find it richly tactile for a flat surface.

07/2004

57.

January 2004

Mixed Media: Lithograph with pastels & Prisma pencil

19" x 23"

Fall's Yellow Couture

Along side of the influence of nature's Fall colors, this work was inspired by the poem "Couture" by Mark Doty found in his collection of poems "ATLANTIS" c.1995, Harper Collins books; originally published in the magazine 'Defined Providence'.

 

58.

August 2004

Mixed Media Collage/Construction: Recycled cans, acrylic paints on metal, broken glass, wire, plastics, rusted auto chrome, reversed street graffiti, nails, telephone wire, vinyl, rusted spike, screws, nails, twine, etc.

19" x 21 1/2" X 2"

Summer; Recycled

One day I came across a flattened lime colored soft drink can which reminded me of a shape in several of my works. I decided to work with it and other found items which I pick up during hikes in the woods or along streams, as well as stuff that just "arrived" along side my city home, or which I discovered in gutters and alleys.  This work is completely "recycled everything," even the back board was a discarded shelf. The frame is a reversal of frame for a paint by number kit which was among "things left from childhood" in the farm home attic.

Graffiti from repeated tagging and the city's attempt to cover it over is used. How? From a transit stop I collected the pieces of a "tag battle." Pieces were falling off due to many seasons of freezing weather and peeling paint.

Also used are paints which weather has removed from a city street light post and rust patterns found on the back side of metallic paint, weathered away from the metal birdbath it was to protect.  What else can you locate here?

Expanded list of Materials: Rusting Chrome section of an automobile; assorted flattened or crushed aluminum cans (soft drink and beer); rust encrusted paint flakes; soda carton sections, sealed in acrylic polymer, cardboard sealed in acrylic polymer; chips of dried paint; telephone wires; assorted rusted nails and screws; plastic tubes (brown and green); rusted bottle caps; reversed street graffiti of successive layers and colors; sections of green vinyl; pieces of broken glass bottle; braided color cloth straps; white cloth strip; rusted wire; green paint flaked away from city lamp post; plastic binder strips; cotton swap & stick; piece of blue plastic grocery bag; purple twine; rusted spike; blue plastic piece of unknown origin;acrylic paints;mounted on white birch shelf from discarded cabinet; framed with reversed sections of wooden paint-by-number painting kit frame with purple twine added. All metallic, rust and organic items sealed in acrylic polymers (matt and or gloss).

 
59.

September 2004

Mixed Media Construction: colored pencil and acrylic paints on Serigraph, Woodblock print, and acrylic encased and painted twigs and cedar branch.

22 3/4" x 16 1/2" x 7"

Spring Sprouting Spring

A three dimensional collage of several prints incorporating lithography, serigraphy, woodblock and linocut.  A curved branch of a California cedar forms the structure for this work. It was presented to me by a new partner.  As Spring wells up, new growth and renewed life result. Love hopes.

 

60.

November 2004

Mixed Media: pine wood block with collage of woodblock prints, glass, rust, weather pealed paints, sections of etching plates, Plexiglas, broken pottery, paint tube and paint brushes.

12 1/2" x 11 1/4" x 1 1/2"

Artist's Landscape: "I Still have Phyllis Bramson's Paint Brush"

In 1986 at Miracle Press, Northern Illinois University; along with co-printmaker Robert Appolloni, I printed an edition for Phyllis Bramson which she called "Shaking Still."  Almost two decades later, I discovered Phyllis's paintbrush in my printmaking tool box and decided to incorporate it into this collage upon a woodblock used for printing in the reduction method.  Parts of woodcut prints, paint brushes, canvas stretcher supports, drawing pencils, corners of etching plates and Plexiglas as well as broken pottery and a paint tube all playfully come together to form this artist's landscape.

Expanded list of Materials: Pine wood plank remainder of woodcut, reduction method; woodcut print sections, collaged; large wooden handle paint brushes; small plastic handle paint brushes; broken glass; rust encrusted patterns on back of flaked paint sections from metal bird bath; plastic triangle wedges for canvas stretchers; drawing pencil stubs; corners of etched printing plates; triangle shaped piece of Plexiglas; flaked off green metallic paint pieces; broken sections of blue pottery; old watercolor paint tube; acrylic washes and paints. All metals, rust, and wood parts are coated with acrylic matt or gloss medium.

 

61.

December 2004

Mixed Media Collage/Construction: Recycled cans, metal, glass, wire, plastics, reversed paint with rust, telephone wire, nails, spike, screws, etc.

18" x 24" x 3"

 

Fall; Recycled: Red Fox Hiding

A number of items found in this work were located along hiking trails or streams in Wisconsin including plastic casings from gun shot shells near a lake (mostly likely used for duck hunting).

I was working on this three dimensional collage during the time in 2004 that a controversy was brewing in England over Fox Hunting or the prohibition of it. Not intended to be a statement in either direction, there is a red fox hiding in this work among the numerous recycled items.  Nature continues its renewals and recycling. I find it meaningful to make landscapes which speak to this recycling aspect of nature while also recycling as well: A landscape about recycling by making a landscape of recycled things.

Expanded list of Materials: Assorted crushed and flattened aluminum cans (soft drink, beer and carbonated water);Coaxial Cable & male connector; Torn and abraded plastic soda bottle; Plastic/metal gun shot casings; Plastic baby spoon; Sliver of wood from brown Chinese stilted cabinet (Zhejian province, Late 19th Century; Flattened metal mosquito repellant spray can with paper label; plastic potato chip bag (avocado flavor); Plastic drinking straws; Plastic binding straps in sections; Rusted bottle caps; Aluminum tea candle holders, flattened and shaped; Foil seal from wine bottle; Plastic transit card with magnetic strip; Bike brake cable section and casing; Foil wrapper from oatmeal bar; Plastic restaurant food debit card with magnetic strip; Rusted metal; Plastic tubing; Plastic/foil wrapper for powder drink mix; Sliver of weather worn wood; Home sub-carpet material; Pull cord from item of clothing; Plastic & metal electrical/telephone cable; Rust adhered to paint peeled from metal; Plastic mint candy wrappers; Pieces of broken clay flower pot; Unknown plastic toy part; Foil pull strips from coffee (individual servings); Foil bag and sections from coffee bag (1 lb bag); Postage stamp; Wooden pencils with graphite; Pieces of broken glazed ceramic pottery; Wood section from old city traffic horse; Guitar pick; Plastic stirring straws; Cloth ID/number strips from dry cleaners; Plastic & metal anti-theft strip/ Acrylic modeling pastes, glues and acrylic paints. All rusted metals and wood are coated with acrylic matt or gloss medium. Collage is mounted on 18 x 24 inch wooden artist drawing board.

 

62. SOLD

December 2004

Mixed Media: Lithograph, Serigraph and Etching Collage with pastels, colored pencil, acrylic paints, telephone wire, Plexiglas, acrylic encased twigs, leaves, bark, granite and wooden frame

22 1/4" x 29 1/4" x 6"

Sudden Arrival

"Sudden Arrival" was a long time in gestation. Originally conceived in 1991 as a composite of etching and lithograph proofs, with twigs representing falling trees; this work evolved over more than a decade.  After losing, at that time, numerous friends to AIDS, the work was intended to be a parallel statement comparing Dutch Elm Disease and AIDS and the inability to find a cure for either.  In a mentality of frustration and defeatism, the work was to be called "Why Can't Anyone Stop the Dutch Elm Disease?"

After losing my own partner in 1996, ushering in increasing despair over the growing number of friends taken, by then 68;  the work languished on my drawing desk. I could not muster the energy to complete the work and it  was eventually set aside under my printing press.  While in woods sketching for other works, I would lay on sun drenched soil, longing to be close to those taken.  But with that act, and the complement to it, "Looking Up"; resignation and resolution to the cycles of Nature eventually arrived. This work hence presents the forms of nature's mysterious patterns of recycling and renewal. What often seems sudden is only so because we have failed to perceive smaller transitions and changes. Doesn't Winter always seem to arrive suddenly? Doesn't Death? Here Winter's seeming rapid arrival is presented, pushing Fall along its way, yet Fall's 'giving way' is more gradual: varied forms, shapes and changing color, falling leaves, varied skies, winds and bare branches break through the frame in which we attempt containment.

 
63.

Hand colored drypoint & etching

8" x 6”

Scapeseries 6: Grove Fall

Coloration of this image far surpasses the original monochromatic version printed many years earlier. The copper plate was never editioned although several proofs were printed, even a couple on handmade paper. In anexception to my normal rule, I sold the copper plate which was used for this image to a client who also purchased one of my Scape Constructions.

 
64. SOLD

 August 2005

Oil on Canvas

4’ x 5’

Just Over The Hill

“Will you still love me....when I’m 64?”  Coincidently my 64th work had this arching, raised ‘hill’ motif in the composition....and of course, that song started playing thru my mind.

 
65.

August-September 2005

Hand colored multicolor etchings from single plates

4” x 6” each

Wind Suite:  7 Variations (nos. 1-7)

Re-examined former work which was printed with 3 zinc plates.  For this series in variations, one plate or another was used per print with additional hand coloring added with color pencils while at my travel trailer in central Wisconsin in late Summer and early Fall of 2005.

 
66. SOLD  

Classical Cymbals: Looking Up, Looking In

In late 2005, representatives from the Illinois Philharmonic Orchestra asked me to be one of 16 artists creating hand-painted or mixed media cymbals to promote the 2005-2006 season and educational programs. The challenge was immediate: although I use interplay between what is and what only appears to be three-dimensional in my landscapes, even creating some in actual three dimension; (See: Scape Constructions) all involved working from an initial flat surface.

Not only is a cymbal three dimensional but also comprised of curves: concave and convex sides; not immediately conducive to my linear and cubistic methods. However, the circular circumference of the cymbal was perfect for an image from my Enso Series.

I worked from a 'ghost image' of one of the Enso monotypes. A ghost impression is created by laying printing paper on top of an already printed plate without the plate being re-inked; then passing them through a printing press to capture on paper the residual ink from the printing plate. The result is a pale, less defined image, hence the name 'ghost image' or 'ghost impression.' Upon this 'ghost' impression on Arches heavy stock, white paper, I hand tooled embossments, hand cut aspects from the image, then partially 'pizza cut' it to shape and collage the paper into a shallow cone, which matched the concave side of the cymbal. I also folded and allowed some sections of the paper to 'pop upward' along design lines or cubistic shapes.

I strengthened the image itself with color pencil, chalk pastels and oil sticks. The cymbal was prepared to receive the paper by application of acrylic gesso after blocking out areas I wanted the exposed metal to remain; while the back side conical image on paper was sealed with an acrylic polymer. By creating these two acrylic surfaces, the strength of adherence of the image on paper to that of the metal cymbal would be enhanced. Once merged together and having added the title and my signature to the work, several coats of spray acrylic protectant were added.

The title of this work "Looking Up, Looking In. Cymbalic Landscape" references both the spiritual metaphor of my Enso Series and the nature in which the cymbal and its image must be viewed. Not only is there a "looking up" into the landscape but simultaneously 'looking in" into the cymbal. Viewed from the cymbal's edge, the image is not visible. Viewed frontally or on a tilt, some aspects of the landscape appear flattened as others are 'popped' up three dimensionally even while the overall image is curved recessively into the cymbal. Thus there is a pleasant and intriguing interplay of elements of curvature, flatness, flow and depth folded into the concave side of this cymbal which visually represent parallel elements in music for which the Illinois Philharmonic Orchestra is so well noted.

The Classical Cymbals toured throughout the Spring of 2006. An online auction occured between March 15 and May 13, 2006 followed with live auction on Saturday, May 20, 2006.

 

 
67.

April 2007

Mixed Media

17 1/4” x 11 1/2” x 1 1/2”

Log Jam

The wood block used for printing the work “First Cut” in reduction method was used as the foundation for this three-dimensional work.  In addition to actual fragments of wood block prints sealed in acrylic polymer to what remained of the board are twig, stick and wood segments, broken ceramic pieces, small plastic paint brush handle, a broken flattened pencil found in a parking lot, stone, plastic and glass fragments and a bent rusted tube.  All items are individually sealed in polymers before adherence and acrylic paints were used as well.

 
68.

August 2005

Mixed Media

20 1/4” x 24”

Framed: 25 3/4” x 29 3/4”

Fall Along The Creek

After sketching for this work along a creek on a Fall afternoon, I did actually fall into a creek while retrieving a piece of rusted metal from the water. When ever possible, I like a double meaning to apply in the titles of my works.

 
69.

July 2007

Mixed Media

13 3/8” x 7 3/8” x 4 3/8”

First Cut: Reprise  (Nature Memory Box #1)

Elements used in my Nature Box Series of Scape Constructions are recycled and reused, including my own art works.  Two sections from “The First Cut” find new expression in this work to ‘decorate’ the outside and inside of this recycled wine crate.  I wanted, in some manner, to highlight and protect items I’ve collected from nature.  They are as if ‘relics’ of nature housed in a reliquary, much like precious things of an important or holy person have been treasured in numerous religious traditions.  I realized that if we continue to attempt to separate ourselves, knowingly or unknowingly, from our connection with nature, then my collected items may very well become relics of past things no longer found.  Actually begun while I was working upon “Home,” (now Opus 70); this work was completed first.  With “Home” and this work, I found a means to use my abstract landscape style together with realistic natural items while also beginning a presentation on recycling and nature preservation.  In addition to the reuse of my wood block print; “First Cut: Reprise (Nature Memory Box #1)” is made of a wood wine box, bands of a wooden table placemat, sewing pins, as well as cloth braid and fabric remnants.  All items from nature are sealed in varnish or acrylic polymers.  As with the original “The First Cut,” this work relates to various means, measures and memories of “being cut.”  Each item from nature included in this work (leaf, cedar branch, bark) was cut in some manner.  Do you recall the first time you had awareness of cutting down something and realizing you were injuring or killing a living being? May the memory now be re-presented with a new enlightenment.

 
70.

August 2007

Mixed Media

24” x 24” x 9 3/4”

HOME

For several months I was contemplating about how to incorporate into my work various items from nature which I frequently collect. I’ve previously used sticks, twigs, and bark as integrated portions of works, but how would larger realistic items, such as a bird nest, combine with my own style of abstract landscapes? It is said that resolutions often come in dreams. It came to me one night that my art style could surround, decorate and highlight any item or series of items from nature. It was equally becoming apparent to me that if we continue to abuse, neglect and overuse nature, such collected remnants might very well become ‘relics of nature,’ and my decorating of them might be seen as reliquaries in some manner. Hence began my ‘Nature Memory Box’ series and works like this one which is simply called “HOME.” Here a bird nest, presented within a simple open box held by a branch fragment, is decoratively surrounded by folded sections of a lithograph and serigraph combination to which has been added acrylic paint and washes. I chose a fibrous fabric stretched over canvas to balance the background with the bird nest.

 
71.

October 2007

Mixed Media

13 3/8” x 7 3/8” x 4 3/8”

Autumnal Flow (Nature Memory Box #2)

Second in a series I refer to as Nature Memory Boxes; ‘relics’ of nature are preserved for special display and decoratively presented with one of my cubist landscape works as well as other recycled items:  wooden wine box, wooden table mat sections, decorative pins, plastic ‘fish’ beads, fabric and braid remnants and a cobalt colored house coat belt.  The organic items: fallen leaves and broken wood, are preserved in acrylic polymer or varnish and a granite stone from a Fall creek is added.  A smaller reddish stone “floats” above to give contrast, emphasizing the flow in nature and the weight of gravity which seems to arrive with Autumn.  After all, being ‘swept away’ seems to always be a heightened part of Fall’s domain.